The final agreement paid tribute to the capabilities of Holbrooke and its negotiating team; Secretary of State Christopher, who, on critical points, was instrumental in keeping the Bosniaks on board and concluding the agreement; Anthony Lake, who helped sell the peace initiative to the parties concerned and who, together with Holbrooke, insisted that the final talks take place in the United States; To the Deputy National Security Advisor, Mr. Samuel Berger, who chaired the meetings of the Committee of Deputies, who briefed people on the national security operations of other nations of what happened without much interference; and UN Ambassador Madeleine Albright, who effectively defended the united States` strong position in the world Organization. In late August 1995, following an attack by Bosnian Serbs in Sarajevo, NATO carried out airstrikes against Serbian positions. On September 1, Holbrooke announced that all parties would meet in Geneva. When the Bosnian Serbs did not meet all NATO conditions, NATO airstrikes resumed. On September 14, Holbrooke managed to sign an agreement between Bosnian Serb leaders Radovan Karadžić and Ratko Mladić to end the siege of Sarajevo and lay the groundwork for the final peace talks to begin in Dayton, Ohio. If a vendor asks a department to complete a credit application during the purchase process, employees can send Ohio University`s Standard Credit Application Response [PDF] to suppliers. If a vendor requests more information, please contact Contract Services at contracts@ohio.edu. The immediate objective of the agreement was to freeze the military confrontation and prevent its resumption. It has therefore been defined as a “construction of necessity”. [11] Dayton Accords, peace agreements of November 21, 1995, by the presidents of Bosnia, Croatia and Serbia, which end the war in Bosnia and outline a general framework agreement for peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

It retained Bosnia as a single state composed of two parts, the Bosnian-Croat Federation and the Bosnian Serb Republic, with Sarajevo remaining the unshared capital. . . .